How to Keep Your Phone Clean

Close-up of man texting on phone

Studies have shown that cellphones are one of the dirtiest objects we come into contact every day. Shockingly, the average phone has 18 times more bacteria than a public restroom handle – and you’re probably wondering why. Our phones are always traveling with us to work, to the restroom, to the kitchen, etc. It’s one of the top essentials you need. And with the ongoing coronavirus disease, it’s more important now than ever to keep your hygiene and especially your phone hygiene at bay. 

With our tips and suggestions, you don’t have to worry about your phone becoming a breeding ground for bacteria. And to make it even easier for you, we’ll also help you clean your phone on the inside with those unnecessary files and apps you still have. Here’s how to keep the germs away, and your peace of mind at bay.

The Ins and Outs of Phone Hygiene

So how do you clean your phone from the inside and outside? 

A Clean Phone is a Happy Phone:

    • The most obvious thing you should be doing is cleaning your phone. A good start is a mixture of 60% water and 40% alcohol with a microfiber cloth. Swipe it gently across the front and back of your phone as well as a case if you are using one. A few times a month is good to destroy the germs from your phone. However, keep in mind that every phone is unique. Read the manufacturer manual and see the do’s and don’ts on how to clean your phone.
  • Wash Your Hands… Always:

    • I’m sure your parents taught you this when you were young, but surprisingly, a lot of people skip this important step. Washing your hands isn’t only important to help with a clean phone, but it also helps your health and safety. Wash your hands with soap for at least 20 seconds to help destroy the germs on your phones. Do it a few times a day such as once you get home, or after using the bathroom. And if you’re outside, a hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol will also help destroy germs and bacteria. By washing your hands, you’re reducing contaminating your phone when you touch it!
  • You’re Not Married to Your Phone:

    • If you’re reading this sitting on a toilet in the bathroom – then this part is important to you! You’re not committed to your phone, which means you don’t need to bring it everywhere, especially in the bathroom. When you flush the toilet, germs spread everywhere, especially on your phone. Leave your phone outside the bathroom. And if you’re going to be there a while without entertainment, shampoo labels have always been there for you.
  • Delete Your Ex’s Photos Already:

    • We know it hurts, but it hurts more when your phone keeps telling you that there is no more data storage when you want to take a picture. The average number of photos individuals have on their phone is over 2000; a lot of them are unfortunately exes and unnecessary photos. Take the time to delete photos you don’t need – especially that ex from like 2 years ago. If you do have photos that are important to you, Allvoi recommends linking your phone to a cloud or a drive so you can keep the photos there instead of your phone. More phone storage means more photos with your new partner!
  • Your Phone is Getting Slow Isn’t It?:

    • Is your phone getting slow and you’re wondering why? Do you ever check to see how many apps you’re not using? Go on your phone right now and check to see how many apps you’re using. I’m guessing you’re only using 40% of those apps, right? It’s high time to finally remove those unused apps you’ve been saving on your phone thinking you’ll use it. You’ll have more data storage so you can take more photos and download apps you can actually use. Best of all, your phone will start working faster too.
  • Help prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep your phone clean with our recommendations. Our phones are an essential part of our lives, and by doing our part to reduce germs and bacteria – we’ll have good hygiene and good phone hygiene too. Have any more tips? Comment them down below. And read our other article on what other essentials you need for the health crisis.